That they be, so long as they use it, uncapable of bearing any office in the commonwealth

That they be, so long as they use it, uncapable of bearing any office in the commonwealth

William Sheppard, sergeant-at-law, a great stickler, during the ascendency of the Rump, for the reformation of the law and the correction of manners, thus sets forth certain grievances, and, like a good Samaritan, propounds a remedy for them in his work, entitled ‘Englands Balme.’

The character of this puritanical reformer’s liberality may be estimated by his proposed remedies for the abuses of the [Pg 143] press

“That there is no certain and clear law to punish prophane jesting, fidling, ryming, piping, juggling, fortune-telling, tumbling, dancing upon the rope, vaulting, ballad-singing, sword-playing, or playing of prizes, ape-carrying, puppet-playing, bear-baiting, bull-baiting, horse-racing, cock-fighting, carding, dicing, or other gaming; especially the spending of much time, and the adventuring of great sums of money herein.

James’s, when [Pg 144] he had merely “rooked” a gay city ‘prentice of five pounds at a shilling ordinary in Shire Lane

“That to the laws already made: 1. That it be in the power of any two justices of the peace to binde to the goode behaivour such as are offensive herein. 2. 3. (more…)

Continue ReadingThat they be, so long as they use it, uncapable of bearing any office in the commonwealth